Tag Archives: e-book

A Major New Fantasy Market Opens

Amazon just announced the launch of another publishing imprint, 47 North.  This new imprint focuses on speculative fiction genres, namely science-fiction, fantasy, and horror.

See the link below for commentary from both The Passive Voice blog and author Michael Stackpole.

Link to article on The Passive Voice.

As for me, I find it interesting that the kings of digital self-publishing distribution, Amazon, have now become actual publishers and are releasing both new and backlisted novels.

What does this mean for digital self-publishing pursuits?

As with any publisher, I suspect they’ll solicit deals with those indie/traditional published writers who are making a splash in the market with consistently high sales.

I’m not sure if 47 North will be open to direct query or agent contact.  That remains to be seen.

This announcement, while intriguing, doesn’t change my publishing plans at this moment.

What do you think about this new development?  Does it change anything for your writing/publishing plans?

 

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Digital Publishing?

Or what are you waiting for?

Consider this:

What are the odds of the average aspiring writer to first land an agent, then have that agent land a publishing deal, and then have that publisher produce a hardback copy of the new author’s book?  That is the dream that originally drove most of us still unpublished novelists.  How much time does this take once your manuscript is finished?  Up to a year to find an agent, another possible year to find a publisher, and at least another year to get an accepted manuscript printed and in stores.

Where will these books be sold besides in online mega-stores like Amazon or B&N?  Borders is gone.  Barnes and Noble brick and mortar stores are struggling.  Are there any independents going to be around?  Increasingly bestsellers are being sold at big box stores like WalMart and Costco.  New authors, mid-listers and genre writers need not apply.  I’ve read enough about diminishing advances, publishers’ insistence on owning and controlling all rights, including e-rights, forever, and other practices to worry me.

I originally had the dream of seeing my books in bookstores.  Some part of me aspires to that still.  But, what that dream really means is that I want readers for my stories.  If I can put my stories into the hands of the readers via a convenient and timely mechanism, whatever you want to call it, then why wouldn’t I take the opportunity while the barriers to entry are still low?  What is that old adage, “Fortune favors the bold?”

Yes, the whole industry is in flux and questions remain, but such transitions also create opportunities for those willing to take advantage.  If we wait too long until things “settle” then many windows may close, some permanently.

I can’t predict the future, but I can predict that I’d rather start selling my novel the day it’s finished and develop a readership than finish my novel and wait up to three years for publication IF my book is deemed worthy of print by the gatekeepers at the big publishing houses.

What of the risk?  Won’t self-publishing taint my reputation and cause traditional publishers to avoid me like a pariah?

What is the real risk for aspiring/unknown/unpublished authors?

We don’t have contracts that a slighted publisher can cancel.  We don’t have agents who try to keep us traditional so they can get their 15% commission.  We don’t have a reputation to harm by writing and publishing an unsuccessful book.  If it doesn’t sell, is our career doomed?

Really?

Of course not.

A book that doesn’t sell is just a book that doesn’t sell.  Write a better next book and sell more.  Write an even better third book and sell even more.  Sell enough and more opportunities present.  If that concern is too high, use a pen name.  Many famous and successful authors have used pseudonyms.

I don’t presume to advise anyone on the correct path.  I haven’t gone far down either path to have much experience to share.  But, I like the options, I like the potential, and I’ve waited too long in my own burgeoning career to keep waiting for either the industry to shake out or for the snail’s pace of the traditional process.

Who cares the most about my future writing career?  An agent?  An editor?  The board of directors at a big publishing house?  Or me?

Easy answer.

What about Amazon?  Aren’t they the big bad wolf?

I don’t care about Amazon.  I’m not pro-Amazon or anti-publishers.  Amazon digital publishing does currently offer the widest possible customer/potential reader base and that potential is tough to ignore.  And ultimately, any successful business needs customers.  Whether we like it or not, a writer is a business owner and the products are the written word.

I’ve had some recent conversations with those who have concerns about digital publishing and in many ways those comment threads felt like a few writers sitting in a coffee shop trying to convince each other of the best path to publication.  There are many valid points on both sides, some more emotional and less founded in evidence or fact than others.  I think we actually agree on more points than we disagree.  That is the beauty of such conversations.  All points can be explored and considered and every side of a topic can be covered.

Ultimately, the paths are many and each writer’s journey will be story until itself.  We must each decide our course based on the winds, weather, seaworthiness of our vessel and the capabilities of our captain and crew.  We must navigate towards the goal we have in mind.

Remember, though, when comparing traditional publishing to self/indie publishing,  we can’t really compared traditional publishers directly to Amazon digital publishing because Amazon isn’t really a publisher for digital indie published works, they are a distributor.

The author is actually the publisher and that is a different business model.  Author as publisher requires new and different skills and demands on the author’s time and that path is not for everyone.  Although many famous and historical authors self-published (as was not uncommon in the 19th and early 20th century), the latter 20th century publishing culture turned self-publishing into a negative connotation dubbing the process “vanity” publishing.  That culture has changed and the technology is now available for an author to write and publish an eBook for literally no cash investment, if he/she can do all the publishing tasks themselves.  This again a valid and increasingly respected path for writers.  Not a better path, another path.

What about the quality of work?  Don’t writer’s need an editor to maximize their stories?

The quality of work published varies with both traditional publishing and indie publishing.  The overall level of quality is arguably better with traditional publishing due to over a century of professionals investing their careers into the industry.  But even that doesn’t guarantee quality.

How would you as author feel if your big break into traditional publishing came with assignment of either a neophyte editor or musical chairs of editors, each less invested in your story than the previous?  I don’t have data to support, just enough anecdotal evidence to validate that it does happen.  This partially invested editor navigates the publishing process poorly and your book gets a rushed copy edit, a cover you hate, a title change you don’t agree with and publication with little or now marketing push.  Your book is published, it’s on a few bookshelves?  But now what?  How do you sell enough to earn out your tiny advance?  Especially in genre fiction?  This isn’t the only possibility, many authors have great experiences, but getting through the gatekeepers as new/unknown author doesn’t get you the attention of the publisher’s A team, either.

But aren’t self-published eBooks mostly garbage?

With the low barriers to entry with digital publishing, dreck will be published by authors who are not ready and haven’t honed their craft enough.  To me, poor sales and poor reviews are in some ways more timely and more useful feedback for a prematurely published author than several months worth of form rejection letters from agents or editors.  With digital, you can take the book down, rewrite it, re-title it, recover it and repost it.  With little or no cost.  If you hate the title or cover of your traditionally published book, good luck getting it changed.

As David Gaughran espouses in his “Let’s Get Digital” eBook, even self-published authors should hire a professional editor to raise the story quality publishable levels.

In fact, anyone even remotely considering self-publishing eBooks via Amazon or other outlets would be wise to read Gaughran’s entire book on the subject.  I’ve read it twice and it paints a crystal clear picture of both why and how to publish digitally.

My goal is not to debate with those who really want to follow the traditional publishing route, but to counter what I perceive as a wariness and caution by many writers and bloggers of the digital publication process and the current players.  I went through that cycle of doubt awhile back and can no longer remember the exact moment I decided to go digital.

Actually I do.

Almost a year ago, a member of my writer’s group came back from a conference and reported to us that editors and agents were communicating to new authors that fantasy manuscripts over 125K words were no longer being considered.  I confirmed this with an email to the editor of Pyr books.  I was at 90K words and only halfway through an epic fantasy novel meant for a trilogy.  The estimated total would be 180K plus.  I spent ten months on this manuscript and was now being told the market wouldn’t accept it, regardless of the quality.  (For a great analysis of word count for epic fantasy, see this post on The Undiscovered Author.)

So, I put my novel on hold and went back to the drawing board, drafted a prequel that would be a shorter, more compact introduction to the trilogy (in the same way The Hobbit is a shorter, more linear, simpler story that introduces Middle Earth and key players).

To my shock and surprise, after using the Snowflake Method as advised by Randy Ingermanson, my scene list and outline estimated my supposedly shorter prequel to be 175K words to tell the story right.

It was then back in February of this year, I think , that I decided the books could be as long as I wanted if I published digitally.  So, having made the decision, I started researching how to do that successfully.

What does that all mean?

Consider my thoughts a presentation of the concerns and fears some aspiring writers have about the current traditional publishing model and the great opportunity I see for creating, as an author, my own a publishing company and distributing my works via available channels, Amazon, B&N PubIt, Smashwords, Overdrive, and possibly LightningSource for printed copies of my books.

I like the future, as uncertain as it may be.  I will have more wisdom and insight once I’ve actually gone through the process, but for now, I’m willing to try.  I feel the risk is worth the attempt right now.  That may change if the whole thing shakes up again, but for now, this new model seems to be an open window.

A window I’m willing to not only look through, but climb through.

Are you?


How to Escape Unpublication

…or how I am going to do it.

The first step in escaping unpublication is outlined in the progress update below:

I may have mentioned previously that the working title of my writing group’s anthology is Offerings.  Here’s a brief progress update on this project.

Five stories were submitted for review by the group on August 1 with first draft critiques due on August 17.  Based on those critiques, each writer will make revisions/edits with the goal of completing and submitting a 2nd draft by September 5.

As you can see from the progress bar to the right, my own story “The Last Portal” has almost 90% of the 2nd draft to go this weekend.

Is it obvious what I’ll be doing until the end of Labor Day?

So, a little more about this project and my story to pique some interest.

Offerings will be published electronically in e-book format and will be available on Kindle, Nook, iPad, and any other eReader device on a date in the near future.  I’ll give a more specific date when we get the details settled.

The anthology will contain six stories which are more accurately called novelettes, since each will run at least 10,000 words or approximately 25-30 pages long.  Therefore the finished collection will contain close to 200 pages of stories.

The stories will be of the fantasy genre, with a few being epic fantasy, and at least one being contemporary or urban fantasy.  Each story builds on the common theme of sacrifice and/or the price of freedom.

My own story, “The Last Portal” is an epic fantasy story about sacrifice that currently runs about 15000 words.  I have mentioned before this story is set in the distant past of the same world in which I am writing a fantasy series.  I hope this story can serve as a way to enrich the story world of Laurentia and provide a mythology or history for the characters in the future.

So what is my story about?

A disgraced member of the divine Jadra race is called upon to discover what threatens the Portal that protects their underground civilization from the evil and corruption on the surface.  However,  nothing is as it seems and the threat is far worse than he could have imagined.

Once my story has been fully edited and finalized over the next several weeks, I will post excerpts here for all to preview.

So far, this has been an exciting venture and I look forward to the next steps as we all compete final drafts of our stories and prepare the collection for e-book publication.

Since we are publishing this anthology ourselves, we are handling the editing, formatting, book cover, submission, and accounting ourselves.  It will be interesting how the details unfold and I’ll provide updates on each significant step so you can see the process in action.

With the changing landscape in publishing and the access authors have to directly provide stories to readers, the path ahead seems ready for travel.  Writers no longer need to wait for some distant agent or editor to endorse or accept their work.  If you write at or near a professional level, you can escape unpublication on your own.  You can put your stories directly in the hands of readers who are eager for new stories and discovering new authors.

For far more expert advice than I can provide.  Read the “Think Like a Publisher” blog series on Dean Wesley Smith‘s blog.  He is a publisher, editor, author, and teacher who has written and published over a hundred fictional works.  His advice is golden.

Soon, I’ll be posting about my experiences setting up my own publishing company.

Is anyone else involved in the publication process?  How is it going?  What have you learned?


Real Name vs. Pen Name

Many aspiring authors get to a point in their writer’s journey where submissions and potential publication are on the agenda. One question that needs answering is “Under what name will you publish?”

What name? Really? Isn’t that a given? My name, of course. I was born Mark Taylor, and everyone who knows me knows me by that name. (Okay, not everyone knows my middle name, but I’ll talk about that in a bit.)

Shouldn’t I use the written version of my identity, my honorific, my calling card, and the name printed on my birth certificate?

Possibly.

Are there reasons not to use a real name when assigning author credit to a work of fiction? What are the benefits and obstacles of using a pseudonym? Do readers even care about the name on the book?

Let’s discuss.

For many writers and authors, it is not even a question. They use their given name on their books and stories. This serves to expand their identity to include an author identity from which they can relate professionally to peers in the industry, publishers, agents, lawyers, and of course readers. The author brand created and maintained is an extension of the identity their maintain in their personal lives.

There is also a certain thrill, a professional satisfaction, of seeing your own name in print beneath the title of a story or book. My lone experience with this is my published story, “Time Soldier”. It was my first and only publication to date and seeing my name both in the table of contents and under the story title in that little literary magazine from Colorado was amazing and a bit surreal. I aspire to recreate that experience with my new works of fantasy.

A big part of me wants to see my name, the name I use all the time, for my written works. I want to see my name on my books on Amazon.com and at the local Barnes and Noble store.

After all, I’m writing the stories. Shouldn’t I give myself credit? Shouldn’t I be proud of my work and stand behind it by putting my own name on each story?

Why wouldn’t I do this? Why would any writer use another fictitious name?

Wikipedia defines a pen name as:

“A pen name, nom de plume, or literary double, is a pseudonym adopted by an author. A pen name may be used to make the author’s name more distinctive, to disguise his or her gender, to distance an author from some or all of his or her works, to protect the author from retribution for his or her writings, or for any of a number of reasons related to the marketing or aesthetic presentation of the work. The author’s name may be known only to the publisher, or may come to be common knowledge.”

The excerpt above relates nicely several of the reasons for an author to use a pseudonym.

If an author’s real name is either too common or too similar to that of a published author, he might use a pen name.

If an author is prominent in another field or industry and wants to keep professional identities separate, she might use a pen name.

If an author’s real name is not marketable enough because it is too unique, difficult to spell, or difficult to remember, he might use a pen name.

Who is to judge if any of these criteria apply?

Some authors use initials or a middle name to distinguish from other published authors or even prominent celebrities.

Popular suspense writer Dean Koontz went by Dean R. Koontz for many years. World famous Harry Potter author Joanne Rowling goes by J. K. Rowling. Fantasy and sci-fi author Orson Scott Card obviously uses his full given name.

What does this mean? Is there a right or wrong way to name yourself?

Ultimately, it boils down to author preference. No one, not even a publisher, will tell you what name to use. (Although if you are an established genre writer and wish to change genres, your agent and/or editor may suggest a pseudonym. )

After all, even Stephen King used the pseudonym Richard Bachman for his non-horror works

As for me, I am undecided. My given name was indeed given to me, and with a pseudonym I could choose any name I want.  But do I want an alternate identity as an author?

That is the question every author must answer.

Are you using a pseudonym?  Do you plan to use a pen name?  Why or why not?


Major announcement coming soon!

A brief alert to everyone that I will be announcing details of a major new project in the coming weeks.  While I run the marathon that is writing my epic fantasy novel, The Lost Tower, I am now involved in a side project that will fully illustrate the concept that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.

Does that sound vague enough?  Good.  I am holding off on sharing the details until a bit later.  Check back for updates.

I am very excited about this project and it will serve as an excellent foray into the world of publishing.  There, that’s a little hint.

More to come.

In the meantime, read this announcement by J.K. Rowling regarding the Harry Potter franchise and you’ll know why my decision to e-publish my epic fantasy series feels like the right one.

Link to article in the Huffington Post.

–Mark


Deal heard round the world…

A few weeks ago I discussed the e-revolution, especially the advent of e-reader devices such as the Kindle, Nook, and iPad.  The original post, if you missed it, is here.

What I didn’t discuss in that previous post is the relative success many authors were having in publishing directly for the e-reader market.  I am not talking about the success of the e-book version of the latest Stephen King novel.  I am referring to previously unknown and unpublished writers who are publishing original fiction for the first time in e-book format and are selling via Amazon.com and BN.com.

What does this mean?  Why should you care?

Well in my recent poll on e-readers, 57% of respondents indicated they either had an e-reader or planned to get one soon.  I imagine across the English-speaking world, when prices continue to drop, more people will buy them.  Those that do will find that they read more and buy more e-books than they normally would buy print books.  This increases the market for new material.

Buy more e-books?

Yes, when you can log into the Amazon store right from you Kindle and can immediately search and download a new book at midnight, from the beach, or in an airport you’ll probably agree.

And you’ll agree that the price of e-books, which currently ranges from free to an average of around $12 for the latest bestseller release, is attractive and you may find you don’t miss those $25 hardcover price tags.

It also means that times are changing.  Technology is bringing writers and readers closer together and the time it takes for a writer to publish a book and put it in the hands of readers can be drastically reduced with direct e-publishing.

A writer can finish an edited, packaged, formatted, e-book on Monday and have it posted for sale that same day.  That may not seem like a big deal, but consider that the average time a print publisher takes to publish a new work is close to a year and often much longer.  That means the brand new bestseller you bought last week for $25 was written by the author a year ago.  Yes, a one year delay.

But who is doing this?  Who is publishing e-books only and is having any success?  See this announcement in the NY Times: http://mediadecoder.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/03/24/self-publisher-signs-four-book-deal-with-macmillan/

Who is this Amanda Hocking?

A bout a year ago, Amanda Hocking was a frustrated writer of young adult paranormal romance/fantasy, like “Twilight” and others.  She couldn’t attract the interest of a print publisher, so she published several of her novels as e-books through the Kindle store and within ten months or so she had sold over 1 million copies.  She made over $2 million dollars and now has a big deal worth another $2 million plus for four new books with St. Martin’s Press, one of the big six publishing houses.

She came from nowhere, couldn’t get published, published herself via e-books, and now she has effectively taken the publishing world by storm.   Read what she has to say about this big deal here:  http://amandahocking.blogspot.com/2011/03/blog.html

This news and Amanda Hocking’s success is what you call a game changer.  The landscape for writers has been redesigned and is far more open than when the only path forward was through the gatekeepers in New York.

Let’s be honest.  Many, many people will publish their e-books and 90% of them will be unedited, unpolished, unformatted, or just plain terrible.  When it is that easy to create something to sell, people will indeed try.

But, the marketplace is the great equalizer and only the cream will rise to the top.  Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and other e-books vendors display sales rankings and customer reviews so a discerning reader can sift through all the dirt to get to the gold.  There will plenty to choose from, but unlike the slow browse through the stacks at a library or bookstore to find something good to read, you can simply do a keyword, author, title, or genre search and then sort and shop the results to find what you want.

It’s fast, it’s easy, and it’s not the future.

It’s the now.

It’s a brave new world for publishing and I, for one, think it is a great time to be a reader AND a writer.

What do you think?


Scott's Grimoire

MY SPOT OF INK: my ramblings on the ups and downs of writing a fantasy novel (or anything else that grabs my interest - books, food, movies, life)

The Undiscovered Author

A Day in the Life of aspiring Fantasy Author Stephen A. Watkins

Geoff's Ruminations

The thoughts and passions of a hopeful future author.